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Blumberg & Associates Motto
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What Happens When You Are Caught With Dangerous Drugs in Arizona?

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Throughout the state of Arizona, the use of illegal drugs is strictly prohibited. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Arizona had the 12th highest drug mortality rate in the United States during the year 2014. This statistic warrants concern, as Arizona is not even in the top quartile for the most populous states in the nation. As a result of the widespread drug-related deaths in Arizona, government officials have implemented stricter laws in an attempt to crack down on the prevalence of drug use. Thus, an individual who has been charged for possessing “dangerous” drugs, is at risk of receiving serious penalties that may even require years of jail time. If you have been charged with drug possession and you wish to reduce your punishment or clear your name from this serious charge, you will need the assistance of a highly skilled Arizona drug attorney.

What Are Dangerous Drugs in Arizona? 

Arizona has a specific classification of drugs that they consider “dangerous.” Almost every narcotic that is not marijuana can fall into this category. Examples of common dangerous drugs include but are not limited to:

  • Methamphetamine
  • Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)
  • Amphetamines
  • Mescaline
  • Hallucinogenic mushrooms
  • Clonazepam
  • Xanax

Many of the drugs that fall into the “dangerous” category are prescription drugs that are taken without proper medical approval. In total, there are about 332 dangerous drugs in the Arizona revised statutes.

What Is The “Threshold Amount”? 

Arizona has specific and varying threshold amounts for each drug. If you are found in possession of a drug above the threshold amount, then there is a rebuttable presumption that you have the intent to sell or distribute the dangerous drug. This distinction is significant because the intention to distribute a dangerous drug comes with a much more serious penalty than just merely possessing the drug.

What Are The Penalties For Dangerous Drug Possession?

The penalties for dangerous drug possession depend on a wide range of factors and what the defendant intended to do with the drug. The various charges are as follows:

  • Possession of use of a dangerous drug: Class 4 Felony
  • Committing fraud to obtain a dangerous drug: Class 3 Felony
  • Possession of equipment that can be used to manufacture a dangerous drug: Class 3 Felony
  • Possession of a dangerous drug for sale: Class 2 Felony
  • Administering a dangerous drug to another individual: Class 2 Felony
  • The manufacturing a dangerous drug: Class 2 Felony
  • The transportation of a dangerous drug for sale: Class 2 Felony

In Arizona, the lower the classification, the more serious the punishment is. Additionally, if you are a second time offender that has previously been convicted with drug crime, your punishment is likely to be even harsher. Serious drug crimes in Arizona can lead to penalties that include up to 20 years in prison. You should be aware that possession of methamphetamine for sale will mandate a minimum of ten (10) years “flat” in prison.

Have You Been Charged With a Dangerous Drug Crime? 

Dangerous drug crimes in Arizona are not taken lightly. If you have been charged with a dangerous drug crime, it is central that you consult a skilled Phoenix criminal attorney at Blumberg & Associates. To discuss your options and schedule a free consultation with us, please do not hesitate to contact us at 602-277-6180 today.

Resource:

cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/statedeaths/drug-overdose-death-2014.html

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